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Finding Information on the Festo CPV-10-GE-CO-8

Comments 8/18/2011: It looks like Festo has changed their web site around.  So some of this information may not work, but since their search still sucks, I hope my basic approach is still useful.  I’ve used strike through to indicate links that no longer work.

I have a Festo CPV10-GE-CO-8 CANOpen valve terminal. Since I found it very hard to find the documentation for it, I am sharing how and where I found the information.

The Festo CPV series is a modular pneumatic valve system, consisting of a base, side panels, up to 8 valves, and a valve terminal top plate. The valve terminal can be directly wired to each valve solenoid, or it can be a fieldbus interface such as CANOpen, DeviceNet, ASI, or Profibus. The second generation valve terminals have an added “2” (so the new CANOpen valve terminal is CPV-10-GE-CO2-8), and some added features, such as more connector options (the CO has only one option: a single M12; the CO2 can use DB9M, dual M12, or terminal block), and a connector for adding additional CPV valve blocks to the same fieldbus interface.

Searching on google for model name (CPV-10-GE-CO-8 or CPV10-GE-CO-8) and number (175481) didn’t turn up anything useful. You have to search on Festo’s website using the full text search. For example, searching for CANOpen returns the Info 219 document (Festo CANOpen products overview) and on page 3, the CPV-10-GE-CO-8 manual in English, but not the CPV-10-GE-CO2-8 manual.

The best way is to use Festo’s full text search with the manual part number or  manual designation. The problem is to know what the manual part number or designation is. Fortunately you do not have to guess; that information is available from other sources, such as the Info 201 PDF (Fieldbus Direct products) and Info 219. For older products, it’s fortunately that Festo is logical; the second generation valve terminal’s manual designation is P.BE-CP-CO2-EN, and the original product’s manual designation is P.BE-CP-CO-EN.

The same logic applies if you are trying to find information on other Festo products, such as the CPV10-GE-DN2-8 DeviceNet valve terminal – you need to find the manual designation (in Info 201 or Info 218 (DeviceNet products)), and do a full text search on Festo’s website using the manual designation.

Here are some direct links to the Festo CANOpen information (all links are to PDF’s):

12 comments

1 srinivasan,s { 08.05.10 at 9:50 pm }

plz give detail of festo manifold valve model no: cpv-10-v160037 &cpv10-ge-d1018

2 Tony { 08.07.10 at 2:39 pm }

I can’t find any match for those part numbers; I recommend you contact your local Festo sales office or distributor with those part numbers, pictures of the parts, and, if possible, the actual parts themselves.

3 D S DEOKAR { 02.01.11 at 3:25 am }

Pl. inform avalability of CPV10-GE-DIO1-8 any supplier in Maharashtra (India) and offer for the same.

4 Tony { 02.01.11 at 1:00 pm }

Festo India’s home page is here. Also, if you only need one or two, you might be able to buy one from eBay (but check first, e.g. if they will ship to India, the condition, the exact model, etc).

5 Kasper { 10.17.11 at 3:55 am }

Hi Tony

I bought a number of CPVs on eBay hoping it would be an easy and spacesaving way to implent several valves in a hobby project. Discovering that I have to “talk” Fieldbus to them kind of stopped my adventures since that probably requires som sort of expensive PLC (Simatic S7 or better) I hear…
I was hoping to control the valves from an Arduino board and therefore happy to notice that you write “The valve terminal can be directly wired to each valve solenoid” – I haven’t found any documentation of this – can you perhaps elaborate on it so I can avoid Fieldbus, CANOpen etc.
I think I bought 3 or 4 different manifold versions in order to get the correct valves included. Direct connections to the solenoids would be nice!

Great article btw.!

6 Tony { 10.17.11 at 1:04 pm }

Looking at Info 213, it appears Festo made both individual connection (each solenoid has its own connector) and multi-pin plug (all solenoid connections are routed to a connector, e.g. D-Sub) electrical top plates. At a glance, I couldn’t find the appropriate part numbers, but if you’re looking on eBay I’m not sure they’d be helpful (since I doubt the sellers would give them). I recommend figuring out some good eBay search queries, and trying to find Info 213.

The fieldbus direct interfaces are a top plate that connect to the rest of the CPV manifold; I actually have one complete CANOpen CPV manifold, and a spare CANOpen top plate.

For a S7 PLC, you’d be better off trying to find a Profibus or AS-i interface, but I suspect getting a S7 with Profibus or AS-i and the programming software would be pretty expensive. CANOpen isn’t too bad; you can use CANFestival with a PC + interface (Kvaser, Ixxat, Accacetus, VSComm, etc) or port it to a microcontroller. But that could turn into a major project by itself, and is a substantially more complex solution than Arduino.

So I’d recommend trying to find a individual connection or multi-pin plug electrical top plate. If you can’t find Info 213, I can e-mail you my copy from 2005.

7 Kasper { 10.19.11 at 11:57 am }

I’m not sure I found exactly the document you refer to (about info 213), but this gave me some information and insight: http://www.allied-automation.com/pdf/CPX_ELECTRICAL-CONNECTORS_ENUS.pdf
I’d like you to email me your 2005 copy for reference (I suppose you have my adress), but I think I’ll go for a low-tech/low-cost approach anyway.
I took apart one CPV10 and noticed that it was quite easy to remove the top plate and put the structure back together without the PCB and top plate. This leaves the individual connectors exposed and easily accessible. Though the manifold will no longer be IP65, I believe that it is fully functional with the air seals intact. Wiring the individual solenoids should be quite easy with spade-like connectors, so I think I’ll try this first and connect to a relay board which I can control with an Arduino. Not so elegant, but I don’t relly need a bus for my small local project and this should be cheap.

Thanks for the inspiration and input!

BR
Kasper

8 Tony { 10.20.11 at 11:20 am }

Hi Kasper,
Thanks for your feedback. I’m glad you got the manuals. Your link is a good find; that’s Info 200, with lots of good part numbers.
Your plan looks good; from some quick research on PLCCenter, it looks like using Festo’s connectors quickly add up in price (unless you can find a great deal on eBay).
By the way, one thing I don’t like about pneumatics: compressor noise. It’s not bad at work, where we have a really nice variable speed compressor that’s off in the back corner, but I haven’t tried using pneumatics at home because affordable air compressors are very noisy.
–Tony

9 Ohmio84 { 12.18.11 at 2:03 pm }

Best regards, I am from Venezuela. First I want to tell you not speak English and this is being translated by google =)

I have a question, you know there’s a machine that has a FESTO Pneumatic Festo CPV Module DI01 (DI01-GE-CPV10-8). There are three outputs that are not used and I want to use to activate the valves from selectors, and also I have available inputs on the Siemens CPU to put selectors and I activate the three valves. The point is that he could not find how to program the module in step 7, since I find something about cross-references in Step 7.

Specifically I would like to know how you programmed in step 7, the Festo CPV DI01

I’d appreciate it guided me a little.
Thanks in advance.

10 Tony { 12.21.11 at 4:55 pm }

Unfortunately I don’t know Step 7. I might be able to find something in a while, but right now I’d recommend you talk to your local suppliers’ technical support engineers (Siemens first then Festo).

11 Ohmio84 { 12.23.11 at 10:07 am }

Thank you for your answer. I will continue looking into the web, because the Siemens are expensive consultancies.

12 Tony { 01.03.12 at 5:19 pm }

I think you are trying to use a Festo CPV10-GE-DIO1-8 Fieldbus Direct module, part number 165 809. Overall specifications are in Festo Info 201; the DIO1 Spanish documentation is part number 165 820, type P.BE-CP-DIO1-ES.

Do a search on the Festo Venezuela website for either the part number (165 820) or type (P.BE-CP-DIO1-ES); this link should help.

The DIO1 supports 4 fieldbus protocols: Profibus DP, Moeller SUCOnet K, ABB CS31, and Festo fieldbus. I would recommend using Profibus DP with a Siemens PLC, but unfortunately I cannot help you with Profibus.

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