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Making a Panasonic PLC Programming Cable

I’ve added a section on my wiki describing how to make a serial cable to connect to the Panasonic FP0 or FP Sigma Programming Port. Later I hope to update it with more pictures.

Tony

FPG Programming Cable

6 comments

1 marshall { 01.07.11 at 1:23 am }

thanks you,if you want buy plc cable,you can visit my website:www.chinaplccable.com

2 Tony { 01.07.11 at 9:51 am }

Making a FP0 cable is still cheaper — and pretty easy. Also, the newer FP0-R PLC’s can use a standard USB peripheral cable.

But your store does have a good selection of cables, and some cables (e.g. FP1, S7, Logo!) aren’t so easy to make.

3 Gunjal Purushottam { 03.10.12 at 8:06 pm }

We are looking cable for communication , Laptop and PLC , details of PLC Make: Panasonic , PLC : FPG-C24R2H
please send technical as well as commercial details as soon as possible.
thanks

4 Tony { 03.11.12 at 4:08 pm }

You can either make your own FPG tool port cable (it’s the same as the FP0) or buy one from Panasonic.

5 Jim { 09.04.12 at 4:26 am }

I found your blog while trying to hunt down an programmer tool/interface cable for a KT4H Panasonic Temperature Controller. The tool consists of a USB to 2.5mm phone plug cable which also seems to have some active circuitry in a box as part of the cable.

The PN# is AKT4H820. I can not find one of these for love or money so I figured that I might ask here if you are familiar with this cable or could give me a recommendation how to get one that doesn’t involve spending hundreds of dollars.

I am probably capable of making my own cable given that I can find out the pin out and what is contained in the box that is part of the cable.

Oh, and the port type is not FPG .

Any help would be appreciated.

6 Tony { 09.04.12 at 4:05 pm }

You’re probably out of luck. The product page says the tool port is CMOS level; my guess is a CMOS level standard asynchronous serial port (not something more exotic like I2C or SPI). If you’re lucky, your KT4H has a RS485 port.

If you’re going to reverse engineer the tool port, you’ll have to figure out the basic protocol (asynchronous serial (most likely), I2C, SPI, etc) and which pin is what (e.g. Rx, Tx, GND). At least you know the logic levels. The protocol is probably the same MEWTOCOL as the RS485 port, and the USB side is probably an USB virtual COM port.

The AKT4H820 doesn’t appear to be readily available. If you haven’t, it’s still worth contacting your local Panasonic automation distributor.

Good luck!

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